How UN cultural treasures helped set the stage for Game of Thrones


Established in 1945, the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has worked to improve dialogue and understanding between civilizations, cultures and peoples. One of UNESCO’s methods of doing this is by designating and preserving World Heritage Sites, defined as having outstanding universal value to humanity, which it inscribes on the World Heritage List to be protected for posterity.
To date, there are 1,092 natural and cultural places inscribed. The diverse and unique treasures range from the Great Barrier Reef in Australia to the Pyramids of Egypt and the Taj Mahal in India.
Since 2011 UNESCO’s work has become inseparable with the magnificent film locations of the wildly popular Game of Thrones series.
For those tuning in to the show’s final episodes, here’s a look back at the Seven Kingdoms with a nod to the UN cultural agency.
Capital of the Seven Kingdoms
Long before it became known as King’s Landing – one of the Seven Kingdoms and seat of the mighty Iron Throne – the old city of Dubrovnik in Croatia was an important Mediterranean seat of power from the 13th century onwards. Severely damaged by an earthquake in 1667 and by armed conflict in the 1990s, UNESCO is co-coordinating a major restoration programme.
Dubrovnik joined the UNESCO List of World Heritage Sites in 1979.

©UNESCO/Francesco BandarinOld City of Dubrovnik (Croatia).

Battle of the Blackwater 
You may recall the fiery Battle of the Blackwater, or scenes where King Robert Baratheon rules from the Iron Throne in the Red Keep, overlooking Blackwater Bay: Fort Lovrijenac, outside the western wall of the Croatian city, actually played an important role in resisting Venetian rule in the 11th century.
 

UNESCO/Silvan RehfeldSt. John’s Fort, Old City of Dubrovnik (Croatia).

Private retreat for House Martell
It is easy to see why Doran Martell called the Water Gardens of Dorne “my favourite place in this world”.  Actually located in the heart of Seville, the Royal Palace of Alcázar is imbued with Moorish influences that date back from the Reconquest of 1248 to the 16th century. UNESCO points to it as “an exceptional testimony to the civilization of the Almohads as well as that of Christian Andalusia”. 
UNESCO inscribed the Royal Palace of Alcázarin in 1987.

UNESCO/José PuyCathedral, Alcázar and Archivo de Indias in Seville (Spain).

Daenerys’ journey through Essos
When you look at the Medina of Essaouira in Morocco, perhaps you can image The Khaleesi lining up The Unsullied eunuch slave-soldiers in the city of Astapor before renaming Slaver’s Bay,  the Bay of Dragons. But for UNESCO, Essaouira is an exceptional example of a late-18th-century fortified town in North Africa. Since its creation, it has been a major international trading seaport, linking Morocco and its Saharan hinterland with Europe and the rest of the world.
The Medina of Essaouira joined the UNESCO List of World Heritage Sites in 2001.

UNESCO/Leila MaizazMedina of Essaouira, formerly Mogador (Morocco).

Yunkai: ‘A most disreputable place’
In the Yellow City, Daenerys’ language skills are useful with the Yunkai’i, who speak a dialect of High Valyrian. But in Berber, the village of Ait-Ben-Haddou was a popular caravan route long before current-day Morocco was established. The crowded together earthen buildings surrounded by high walls offer a view of a traditional pre-Saharan habitat. 
Ait-Ben-Haddou was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.

UN News/Jing ZhangAit-Ben-Haddou (Morocco).

Theon returns to Lordsport Harbour
County Antrim envelops UNESCO-designated Giant’s Causeway and Causeway coast. It is also home to the small fishing harbour of Ballintoy, known to fans as the port of Pyke, home to the Iron Islands of the Greyjoys. Located in real-life Northern Ireland, the Causeway consists of some 40,000 massive black volcanic rock columns sticking out of the sea. Over the last 300 years, geographical studies have greatly contributed to the development of the earth sciences.
The Causeway coast was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986.

UNESCO/Stefano BertiGiant’s Causeway (Northern Ireland).

Cersei’s ‘Walk of Shame’
The iconic scene in in which Cersei Lannister is forced to walk naked through the streets of King’s Landing began atop of the baroque Jesuit Staircase, which leads to the Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola and Jesuit College in the UNESCO-desnigated Old City of Dubrovnik .

UN News/Mita HosaliThe Jesuit Staircase is located on the south side of Gundulic Square in UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Old city of Dubrovnik.

Kingslayer for gender equality
The connection between the United Nations and Game of Thrones does not end with UNESCO’s inspiring  sites.
While Jaime Lannister is the twin brother of Cersei and slayer of the Mad King, Aerys II Targaryen, real-life actor Nikolaj Coster-Waldau is a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Development Fund. Passionate about ending discrimination and violence against women, the father of two girls is focusing his considerable talents on drawing attention to critical issues, such as gender equality – encouraging everyone to be agents of change.
Mr. Coster-Waldau was appointed a UNDP Goodwill Ambassador in 2016.

UNDPUNDP Goodwill Ambassador, Danish actor Nikolaj Coster-Waldau.

 

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